Ixellent • Sketchblog

Kathryn's Off-topic Sketchblog

Oct 1

unashamedlyfeminist:

Dos and Don’ts this Halloween – Cultural Appropriation Edition
Words by Zahra Wynne

Halloween is my favourite time of the year. Some people love sitting by the fire with a Christmas carol, some people love storming around with outrageous demands on their birthdays, others just want to find an overpriced and overhyped club night on New Year’s Eve. Halloween – that’s for me. There’s nothing I love more than donning a pair of white contacts, slathering my body with hardcore gelatine-made scars and burns, finding a 50p old nightdress at the local charity store and just generally freaking everyone out.

But recently I’ve been noticing some problems that arise throughout my beloved Hallows Eve, namely the rampant cultural appropriation that occurs during those late October days. Thousands of people, ignorant as they may be of their wrongdoing, descend upon parties and clubs and gatherings in blackface, ‘sexy’ Native American outfits, traditional Arab dress with plastic bombs attached – the list is pretty long. What I consider to be a fun and exciting time to dress up and fawn over that person who always has such a good costume, becomes a huge collision of racism and offensive outfits. 

This Halloween, just take a moment to think about what you’re wearing, and what it can mean to people other than yourself. You want to go as a nurse – sexy, scary, perhaps an actual nurse uniform? Fine by me. Zombie pizza delivery boy? That’s cool. You’re that one who always just goes as ‘themselves?’ Annoying, but I’ll let it slide. Here’s a handy little list to get you through this Halloween without offending anyone. Your costume doesn’t have to be insulting to be unique and brilliant!

1.      Don’t mock oppressed groups

The history of harmful and racist practices such as blackface cannot be removed from your costume, whether or not you intended it to be offensive. It only serves to reinforce and normalise racist traditions. It doesn’t matter if you don’t think it’s insulting, because this isn’t about you. Take a moment to consider the feelings of others and the historical dynamics that you are supporting. Planning on attending that party as a ‘Muslim terrorist’? Just don’t. Islamophobia is absolutely rife throughout the Western world, because of the grossly misinformed and damaging stereotypes that all those who practice Islam are terrorists. They’re not, and you know they’re not. Don’t fuel that fire, because thousands are being harassed, persecuted and attacked due to that assumption.

2.      Don’t sexualise oppressed groups

Put down that Native American headdress. Don’t buy that ‘sexy native’ costume. Just because you love Pocahontas, doesn’t mean that you should wear it. Native American women are constantly sexualised in the media – how many ‘fashion’ shoots of native white women with headdresses on do we have to tolerate before you acknowledge that this is a problem? It’s estimated that one in three Native American women are sexually assaulted in their lifetime. Though you may not think you’re contributing to it, the constant objectification of Native American women only adds to this pervasive issue. As well as this, Native American war bonnets are incredibly sacred to their culture. Don’t appropriate this when millions were killed and forcibly removed in the name of adapting to colonial culture.

3.      If you’re called out due to the offensive nature of your costume, don’t accuse somebody of ‘overreacting’

Hearing home truths about yourself or your actions is hard, but being a member of a group that faces systematic oppression, mockery, harmful stereotypes and misrepresentative is a lot harder. Instead of instantly going on the defensive to save face or avoid embarrassment, listen to what the person has to say. Try to understand their points and calmly ask them to explain to you what was offensive about your costume and why. Keep in mind that you are not a member of the culture or group that the offended party is a member of, therefore they probably have more authority to have a view about what constitutes detrimental appropriation than you do.  However, keep in mind that it is not their job to educate you. Disrespectful displays of culture, including in the form of costumes, can be incredibly triggering, and it may be easier for you to simply to do some research than risk further upsetting somebody.

4.      Do celebrate your own culture

Everybody’s culture is rich with history, myths and legends, including yours. If you want to move away from the traditional scary outfit (why you would defeats me), take inspiration from yourself. Why not go as King Arthur? A sexy Elizabeth I? George Washington revived from the dead? Before you scream ‘separatism!’, there is a difference between cultural appreciation and appropriation. Cashing in on something that harms or has harmed others for your own pleasure or to humour your friends is not appreciation, it is not a celebration.

You want to have fun on Halloween, but so does everybody else. Consider the feelings of others and the implications of what you may be wearing. It’s only a costume, other human beings are far more important than that crappy two-piece you bought from the party store 3 years ago. It doesn’t even fit anymore.

Photos via x & x

THIIIISSSS.

(via atomicbritt)


Oct 1

unashamedlyfeminist:

Dos and Don’ts this Halloween – Cultural Appropriation Edition
Words by Zahra Wynne

Halloween is my favourite time of the year. Some people love sitting by the fire with a Christmas carol, some people love storming around with outrageous demands on their birthdays, others just want to find an overpriced and overhyped club night on New Year’s Eve. Halloween – that’s for me. There’s nothing I love more than donning a pair of white contacts, slathering my body with hardcore gelatine-made scars and burns, finding a 50p old nightdress at the local charity store and just generally freaking everyone out.

But recently I’ve been noticing some problems that arise throughout my beloved Hallows Eve, namely the rampant cultural appropriation that occurs during those late October days. Thousands of people, ignorant as they may be of their wrongdoing, descend upon parties and clubs and gatherings in blackface, ‘sexy’ Native American outfits, traditional Arab dress with plastic bombs attached – the list is pretty long. What I consider to be a fun and exciting time to dress up and fawn over that person who always has such a good costume, becomes a huge collision of racism and offensive outfits. 

This Halloween, just take a moment to think about what you’re wearing, and what it can mean to people other than yourself. You want to go as a nurse – sexy, scary, perhaps an actual nurse uniform? Fine by me. Zombie pizza delivery boy? That’s cool. You’re that one who always just goes as ‘themselves?’ Annoying, but I’ll let it slide. Here’s a handy little list to get you through this Halloween without offending anyone. Your costume doesn’t have to be insulting to be unique and brilliant!

1.      Don’t mock oppressed groups

The history of harmful and racist practices such as blackface cannot be removed from your costume, whether or not you intended it to be offensive. It only serves to reinforce and normalise racist traditions. It doesn’t matter if you don’t think it’s insulting, because this isn’t about you. Take a moment to consider the feelings of others and the historical dynamics that you are supporting. Planning on attending that party as a ‘Muslim terrorist’? Just don’t. Islamophobia is absolutely rife throughout the Western world, because of the grossly misinformed and damaging stereotypes that all those who practice Islam are terrorists. They’re not, and you know they’re not. Don’t fuel that fire, because thousands are being harassed, persecuted and attacked due to that assumption.

2.      Don’t sexualise oppressed groups

Put down that Native American headdress. Don’t buy that ‘sexy native’ costume. Just because you love Pocahontas, doesn’t mean that you should wear it. Native American women are constantly sexualised in the media – how many ‘fashion’ shoots of native white women with headdresses on do we have to tolerate before you acknowledge that this is a problem? It’s estimated that one in three Native American women are sexually assaulted in their lifetime. Though you may not think you’re contributing to it, the constant objectification of Native American women only adds to this pervasive issue. As well as this, Native American war bonnets are incredibly sacred to their culture. Don’t appropriate this when millions were killed and forcibly removed in the name of adapting to colonial culture.

3.      If you’re called out due to the offensive nature of your costume, don’t accuse somebody of ‘overreacting’

Hearing home truths about yourself or your actions is hard, but being a member of a group that faces systematic oppression, mockery, harmful stereotypes and misrepresentative is a lot harder. Instead of instantly going on the defensive to save face or avoid embarrassment, listen to what the person has to say. Try to understand their points and calmly ask them to explain to you what was offensive about your costume and why. Keep in mind that you are not a member of the culture or group that the offended party is a member of, therefore they probably have more authority to have a view about what constitutes detrimental appropriation than you do.  However, keep in mind that it is not their job to educate you. Disrespectful displays of culture, including in the form of costumes, can be incredibly triggering, and it may be easier for you to simply to do some research than risk further upsetting somebody.

4.      Do celebrate your own culture

Everybody’s culture is rich with history, myths and legends, including yours. If you want to move away from the traditional scary outfit (why you would defeats me), take inspiration from yourself. Why not go as King Arthur? A sexy Elizabeth I? George Washington revived from the dead? Before you scream ‘separatism!’, there is a difference between cultural appreciation and appropriation. Cashing in on something that harms or has harmed others for your own pleasure or to humour your friends is not appreciation, it is not a celebration.

You want to have fun on Halloween, but so does everybody else. Consider the feelings of others and the implications of what you may be wearing. It’s only a costume, other human beings are far more important than that crappy two-piece you bought from the party store 3 years ago. It doesn’t even fit anymore.

Photos via x & x

THIIIISSSS.

(via atomicbritt)


Oct 1

unashamedlyfeminist:

Dos and Don’ts this Halloween – Cultural Appropriation Edition
Words by Zahra Wynne

Halloween is my favourite time of the year. Some people love sitting by the fire with a Christmas carol, some people love storming around with outrageous demands on their birthdays, others just want to find an overpriced and overhyped club night on New Year’s Eve. Halloween – that’s for me. There’s nothing I love more than donning a pair of white contacts, slathering my body with hardcore gelatine-made scars and burns, finding a 50p old nightdress at the local charity store and just generally freaking everyone out.

But recently I’ve been noticing some problems that arise throughout my beloved Hallows Eve, namely the rampant cultural appropriation that occurs during those late October days. Thousands of people, ignorant as they may be of their wrongdoing, descend upon parties and clubs and gatherings in blackface, ‘sexy’ Native American outfits, traditional Arab dress with plastic bombs attached – the list is pretty long. What I consider to be a fun and exciting time to dress up and fawn over that person who always has such a good costume, becomes a huge collision of racism and offensive outfits. 

This Halloween, just take a moment to think about what you’re wearing, and what it can mean to people other than yourself. You want to go as a nurse – sexy, scary, perhaps an actual nurse uniform? Fine by me. Zombie pizza delivery boy? That’s cool. You’re that one who always just goes as ‘themselves?’ Annoying, but I’ll let it slide. Here’s a handy little list to get you through this Halloween without offending anyone. Your costume doesn’t have to be insulting to be unique and brilliant!

1.      Don’t mock oppressed groups

The history of harmful and racist practices such as blackface cannot be removed from your costume, whether or not you intended it to be offensive. It only serves to reinforce and normalise racist traditions. It doesn’t matter if you don’t think it’s insulting, because this isn’t about you. Take a moment to consider the feelings of others and the historical dynamics that you are supporting. Planning on attending that party as a ‘Muslim terrorist’? Just don’t. Islamophobia is absolutely rife throughout the Western world, because of the grossly misinformed and damaging stereotypes that all those who practice Islam are terrorists. They’re not, and you know they’re not. Don’t fuel that fire, because thousands are being harassed, persecuted and attacked due to that assumption.

2.      Don’t sexualise oppressed groups

Put down that Native American headdress. Don’t buy that ‘sexy native’ costume. Just because you love Pocahontas, doesn’t mean that you should wear it. Native American women are constantly sexualised in the media – how many ‘fashion’ shoots of native white women with headdresses on do we have to tolerate before you acknowledge that this is a problem? It’s estimated that one in three Native American women are sexually assaulted in their lifetime. Though you may not think you’re contributing to it, the constant objectification of Native American women only adds to this pervasive issue. As well as this, Native American war bonnets are incredibly sacred to their culture. Don’t appropriate this when millions were killed and forcibly removed in the name of adapting to colonial culture.

3.      If you’re called out due to the offensive nature of your costume, don’t accuse somebody of ‘overreacting’

Hearing home truths about yourself or your actions is hard, but being a member of a group that faces systematic oppression, mockery, harmful stereotypes and misrepresentative is a lot harder. Instead of instantly going on the defensive to save face or avoid embarrassment, listen to what the person has to say. Try to understand their points and calmly ask them to explain to you what was offensive about your costume and why. Keep in mind that you are not a member of the culture or group that the offended party is a member of, therefore they probably have more authority to have a view about what constitutes detrimental appropriation than you do.  However, keep in mind that it is not their job to educate you. Disrespectful displays of culture, including in the form of costumes, can be incredibly triggering, and it may be easier for you to simply to do some research than risk further upsetting somebody.

4.      Do celebrate your own culture

Everybody’s culture is rich with history, myths and legends, including yours. If you want to move away from the traditional scary outfit (why you would defeats me), take inspiration from yourself. Why not go as King Arthur? A sexy Elizabeth I? George Washington revived from the dead? Before you scream ‘separatism!’, there is a difference between cultural appreciation and appropriation. Cashing in on something that harms or has harmed others for your own pleasure or to humour your friends is not appreciation, it is not a celebration.

You want to have fun on Halloween, but so does everybody else. Consider the feelings of others and the implications of what you may be wearing. It’s only a costume, other human beings are far more important than that crappy two-piece you bought from the party store 3 years ago. It doesn’t even fit anymore.

Photos via x & x

THIIIISSSS.

(via atomicbritt)


Sep 29

premiium:

carry-on-my-wayward-butt:

walkingmyhellhound:

If I’ve learned anything from video games, it is that when you meet enemies, it means that you’re going in the right direction.

that’s really inspiring

holy fucking shit

(via spooky-cat)


Sep 29

“maybe if i drink another coffee, i will feel better”

“maybe if i buy myself a new sweater, i will feel better”

“maybe if i get so drunk i can’t see, i will feel better”

“maybe if i sleep for fourteen hours, i will feel better”

"maybe if I buy another video game, I will feel better."
"maybe if I eat junk food, I will feel better."

(via atomicbritt)


Sep 28

briandanielwolf:

Saturday’s here and that means a new update for Stardust Slammers, only on Cup of Comics! Click the link below for more roller derby magical girls!

Newest Page/First Page

You guys. Roller Derby. Magical Girls. Diverse body types and backgrounds. THIS IS WHAT YOU’VE ALWAYS WANTED, TUMBLR.

Creator Brian Wolf is coo’ and we’re secret internet friends even though we pretty much just play “like” tag and have the same birthday. :3 Go read Stardust Slammers!

I’m ashamed that I haven’t reblogged this until now vnv

(via briandanielwolf)


Sep 27
portlybibliophile:

ultrafacts:

aussietory:

third-way-is-best-way:

tuxedoandex:

kvotheunkvothe:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

EVERY TIME SOMEONE BRINGS UP THE LIBRARY OF ALEXANDRIA I GET SO ANGRY.

but why

Because it got burned. All of that knowledge, lost forever.



The library was destroyed over 1000’s of years ago. The library consisted of thousands of scrolls and books about mathematics, engineering, physiology, geography, blueprints, medicine, plays, & important scriptures. Thinkers from all over the Mediterranean used to come to Alexandria to study.Most of the major work of civilization up until that point was lost. If the library still survived till this day, society may have been more advanced and we would sure know more about the ancient world.

Anger.gif

omg and I thought I was the only one who felt like this.

portlybibliophile:

ultrafacts:

aussietory:

third-way-is-best-way:

tuxedoandex:

kvotheunkvothe:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

EVERY TIME SOMEONE BRINGS UP THE LIBRARY OF ALEXANDRIA I GET SO ANGRY.

but why

Because it got burned. All of that knowledge, lost forever.

The library was destroyed over 1000’s of years ago. The library consisted of thousands of scrolls and books about mathematics, engineering, physiology, geography, blueprints, medicine, plays, & important scriptures. Thinkers from all over the Mediterranean used to come to Alexandria to study.Most of the major work of civilization up until that point was lost. If the library still survived till this day, society may have been more advanced and we would sure know more about the ancient world.

Anger.gif

omg and I thought I was the only one who felt like this.

(via aflagg)


Sep 27
winterhascome:


lauramcquarrie:

transparent ghost sticky notes help you make notes without defacing a book

GHOST-IT NOTES.


No but really I need these. They’re adorable and I can never bring myself to write in a book. TwT

winterhascome:

lauramcquarrie:

transparent ghost sticky notes help you make notes without defacing a book

GHOST-IT NOTES.

No but really I need these. They’re adorable and I can never bring myself to write in a book. TwT

(via spookysage)


Sep 25

Shh superkawaii is coming.


Sep 25

replicaaa:

shout out to people who reblog my art

it’s like when you doodle something and your mom puts it up on the fridge except it’s the internet

(via saccharine-sweethell)


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